hard money


hard money
gold or coins, specie; cash, hard currency; highly stable currency that is accepted worldwide; campaign funds that are used to promote particular candidate (subject to federal regulation)

English contemporary dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hard money — Hard Hard (h[aum]rd), a. [Compar. {Harder} ( [ e]r); superl. {Hardest}.] [OE. hard, heard, AS. heard; akin to OS. & D. hard, G. hart, OHG. herti, harti, Icel. har[eth]r, Dan. haard, Sw. h[*a]rd, Goth. hardus, Gr. kraty s strong, ka rtos, kra tos …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hard money — can refer to:* Hard currency * Hard money donations to candidates for political office * Hard money currency policies * Hard money loans …   Wikipedia

  • hard money — Coin • • • Main Entry: ↑money * * * hard money, 1. currency exchangeable for gold or other precious metal. 2. money maintained at a fixed value in foreign exchange as by means of balance of payments or shipments of gold. 3. money under a banking… …   Useful english dictionary

  • hard money — ➔ money …   Financial and business terms

  • hard money — noun uncount amounts of money, limited by the government, that are given to politicians and can be legally used to influence elections …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • hard money — index cash Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Hard Money — 1. Funding by a government or organization that is repetitive, rather than a one time grant. Examples include ongoing government daycare subsidies or firms that pay annual scholarships to post secondary students. 2. Describes gold/silver/platinum …   Investment dictionary

  • hard money — noun Money backed by specie and easily convertible into foreign currencies …   Wiktionary

  • hard money — Lawful coined money (as contrasted with paper currency) …   Black's law dictionary

  • hard money — Specie; a coin of the precious metals, of a certain weight and fineness, with the government stamp thereon, denoting its value as a medium of exchange, or currency. Henry v Bank of Salina (NY) 5 Hill 523, 536 …   Ballentine's law dictionary


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